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BS: Infrequently Asked Questions

Little Hawk 27 Aug 07 - 01:05 PM
autolycus 27 Aug 07 - 01:01 PM
Cluin 23 Aug 07 - 07:59 PM
GUEST,PMB 23 Aug 07 - 04:25 AM
Azizi 22 Aug 07 - 04:14 PM
Azizi 22 Aug 07 - 04:10 PM
GUEST,Jonny Sunshine 22 Aug 07 - 09:59 AM
autolycus 21 Aug 07 - 01:32 PM
Rowan 20 Aug 07 - 06:46 PM
TheSnail 20 Aug 07 - 11:51 AM
GUEST,PMB 20 Aug 07 - 10:51 AM
TheSnail 20 Aug 07 - 10:32 AM
Liz the Squeak 20 Aug 07 - 09:14 AM
GUEST,Guest Strad 20 Aug 07 - 07:19 AM
Azizi 19 Aug 07 - 11:09 PM
DonD 19 Aug 07 - 09:49 PM
autolycus 19 Aug 07 - 03:38 AM
Rapparee 18 Aug 07 - 10:42 PM
Rowan 18 Aug 07 - 10:33 PM
autolycus 18 Aug 07 - 07:29 PM
Little Hawk 18 Aug 07 - 05:28 PM
autolycus 18 Aug 07 - 05:23 PM
Azizi 18 Aug 07 - 03:29 PM
Azizi 18 Aug 07 - 03:07 PM
autolycus 18 Aug 07 - 02:29 PM
Azizi 18 Aug 07 - 09:26 AM
TheSnail 18 Aug 07 - 06:46 AM
autolycus 18 Aug 07 - 06:31 AM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 17 Aug 07 - 02:07 PM
GUEST,PMB 17 Aug 07 - 08:51 AM
Azizi 16 Aug 07 - 09:49 PM
Azizi 16 Aug 07 - 09:44 PM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 16 Aug 07 - 05:09 PM
GUEST,Keinstein 16 Aug 07 - 05:25 AM
Rowan 15 Aug 07 - 06:44 PM
autolycus 15 Aug 07 - 12:48 PM
JohnInKansas 12 Aug 07 - 10:29 PM
Rowan 12 Aug 07 - 06:15 PM
autolycus 11 Aug 07 - 12:10 PM
autolycus 10 Aug 07 - 05:52 PM
Rowan 09 Aug 07 - 06:27 PM
Liz the Squeak 09 Aug 07 - 01:53 AM
Rowan 08 Aug 07 - 10:39 PM
Amos 08 Aug 07 - 07:19 PM
Rowan 08 Aug 07 - 06:23 PM
autolycus 08 Aug 07 - 10:20 AM
frogprince 08 Aug 07 - 09:30 AM
Cluin 08 Aug 07 - 12:09 AM
GUEST,Art Thieme 07 Aug 07 - 09:34 PM
GUEST 07 Aug 07 - 09:31 PM
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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Little Hawk
Date: 27 Aug 07 - 01:05 PM

"So...didja read O.J.'s new book yet?"


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 27 Aug 07 - 01:01 PM

We ahve a lot of Poles in the UK, but, imho, Poland is where it always was.




      Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Cluin
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 07:59 PM

What does Seth McFarland have against John Mayer?


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,PMB
Date: 23 Aug 07 - 04:25 AM

Most of Poland IS in the UK now, and it's still impossible to get a plumber.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 04:14 PM

And yes, I know that Poland's not in the UK.

I was riffin off a US joke, compliments of GWB. Maybe it's made it way worldwide by now.

But maybe not.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 04:10 PM

GUEST,Jonny Sunshine,

You forgot Poland.

;o)


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,Jonny Sunshine
Date: 22 Aug 07 - 09:59 AM

There's probably nothing to add that hasn't been mentioned already, but here we go..

Britain, England, UK, Great Britain, the British Isles, are have different meanings. It's all very confusing even for people who live there. Look at this which explains, with Venn Diagrams and all.

I can say with certainty and without fear of offending anyone that I live in England which is part of Great Britain, itself a part of the UK. Whether I describe myself as English or British would depend on whether I was talking about geography, nationality, culture. Of course it gets more complex with sports teams.

I always wash my hair first and use the suds for the rest, because if you wash the rest of your body first, those suds never go up..

"Naff"apparently is an acronym allegedly used in gay circles which means "Not Available For F***ing". Though this doesn't really tally with the meaning. Perhaps it's a backcronym, like "camp" (Known As Male Prostitute)

I have never known a CD to melt in the car, but I never leave them in there, so as not to tempt potential thieves with bad taste in music. Though what with the weather the chances of anything melting in my car are pretty remote.

That thign with moving your foot and drawing a 6 in the air, that's wierd..


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 21 Aug 07 - 01:32 PM

Snail, I sit corrected.

   Just to clarify one thing, the terms britain and Great Britain refer to the same lump of rock, Britain when talking about it geographically, G.B. when referring to it as a geopolitical unit.   




   Another IAQ - what am I aware of now, -   and now, -   and now, - and now??? etc.etc.etc.




       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 06:46 PM

When DonD asked "When the Fed pumped billions into the Market to prevent its collapse, how did that work? Whom did they actually give/loan it to?" I thought I'd try, although I'm not a practitioner in the area.

The summary seems to be that some institutions, categorised as 'bottom feeders', loaned money to people who hadn't much chance of paying it back. The bottom feeders financed their operations by borrowing from lenders 'higher up the food chain' and this procedure trailed all the way to the 'top of the market' institutions, who maintain their liquidity by borrowing between themselves. If you look at the chain from the top down rather than from the bottom up it's called 'distributing debt', progressively down to borrowers who are more and more risky at each level of descent; the 'bottom feeding lenders' are the "sub-prime market" that's gone 'bottom up' because the people who hadn't much chance of paying back their loans started not paying their instalments and defaulting.

When that happened the bottom feeders still needed finance to continue operating and sending their kids to school and buying their plasma screens but the institutions from whom they normally borrowed were finding money harder to get, because all the way up the trail everyone wanted to ensure they loaned only to people who could repay it. 'Credit became harder to get' in short and when demand exceeds supply, prices (the interest rates charged) go up. The quantity of money available in the system, to supply the required liquidity, was not enough to enable all the lenders/borrowers at the top of the chain to keep credit available.

So the French equivalent of the Federal Reserve in USA (and the Reserve Bank of Aust.) and other central banks injected money into the system by lending it to the top (and "secure") institutions, usually by selling them particular types of bonds at the wholesale interest rate. This gets paid back in the fullness of time and needs to be controlled to prevent the sort of inflation that occurred in 1930s Germany but, in the short term, it provides cash to lubricate the liquidity among the top banks, who then have some (slightly increased) ability to lend to the ones further down the chain.

A bit long and a bit 'quick and dirty' but I hope it helps.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: TheSnail
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 11:51 AM

I KNOW it doen't include the Isle of Man, that's my ancestral home, and the Channel Islands are off the coast of France. It depends how far you measure "outlying".

And the Dukedom of Burgundy (in Pimlico) was reunited with England in the same year.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,PMB
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 10:51 AM

Well get it reight right, snail.... only most of the outlying islands, not the Isle of Man.... that and the Channel Islands aren't part of the United Kingdom either. And Pimlico has been independent since 1949.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: TheSnail
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 10:32 AM

Since Strad has decided to get picky about autolycus's post of 04 Aug 07 - 10:50 AM, I thought I'd have a go too.

England,Wales and Scotland make up Britain. Add N.Ireland, and you have Great Britain. Add a few VITAL odds and sods and you have the United Kingdom.

This is wrong. The whole nation is The United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland. Great Britain is the countries England, Wales and Scotland with their outlying islands.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 09:14 AM

A 'hoodie' in todays terms is specifically one who wears a hooded top with the hood up and over their face, usually with a baseball cap underneath it, with the intention to make identification difficult. They are synonymous with youngsters who prowl shopping centres such as Bluewater (where they were banned) and Thurrock, both in the south east of the UK (Kent and Essex), looking for fights to pick, trouble to cause and designer labels to nick.

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,Guest Strad
Date: 20 Aug 07 - 07:19 AM

Bristol has never been in Gloucestershire or Somerset. It currently is in the county of Avon but for all us traditionalists it is the City and County of Bristol.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 19 Aug 07 - 11:09 PM

I guess we shouldn't ask such an infrequently asked question, and just be grateful that they saved the 'Economy"!

No. Inquiring minds want to know. But will we ever really know what is really going on in places of power and why things happen the way they do?

I doubt it.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: DonD
Date: 19 Aug 07 - 09:49 PM

When the Fed pumped billions into the Market to prevent its collapse, how did that work? Whom did they actually give/loan it to? In this instance, what the hell is 'the Market'? Did a Fed rep go into the NY Stock Exchange and chuck lots of cash on the Floor? And what about Nasdeq that doesn't even have a floor or a building? And BTW, where did the Fed get all that money when we(US)'re so deep in hock to the tune of trillions already? I guess we shouldn't ask such an infrequently asked question, and just be grateful that they saved the 'Economy"!


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 19 Aug 07 - 03:38 AM

Er - yes.







       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rapparee
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 10:42 PM

Is this an infrequently asked question?


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 10:33 PM

"ignorami: The art of folding pieces of paper torn from mediaeval manuscripts?"

And there I was, thinking of oregano with a black belt!

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 07:29 PM

or maybe even, "How do you mean, the earth moved for you? How does that work?"





       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Little Hawk
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 05:28 PM

Infrequently Asked Questions:

"Was that as lousy for you as it was for me?"


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 05:23 PM

Hey Azizi,

Sorry,'course that's whay you meant - duh moment again.

Doin' good, losing teeth, getting well with my 20something daughters, learning the lessons of my therapy training, meeting nice people around here like you.

'Hoodies' are just youngsters wearing that sort of thing. Believed to be, in part, a way to deal with the virus that is cctv cameras. Not at all necessarily hoodlums, more about the clothing, tho' easily-frightened people ..............um, get frightened by them. Worn by kids from many backgrounds.

How you doin'? (or is that for a pm?






       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 03:29 PM

Btw, Ivor, what are "hoodies?"

Is this the same thing as "hoodlums" meaning teens or young adults who are involved in {or who people think they are involved in} gangs or who engage in other anti-social behavior? Come to think of it, two words some Americans use as a referent for hoodlums are "gangbangers" and/or "hoods".

But in the USA "hoodies" are a type of sweatshirt. Here's a definition for "hoodie" that was posted on urbandictionary.com by by Sylense May 6, 2004 :

Hoodie
"sweatshirt with a hood and a very large pocket in front, capable of carrying, but not limited to, walkman and headphone, candy being smuggled into movie theatres, pencil and notebook, pet snake that your parents don't know about, and certain less-legal substances that you don't want people finding. Considered a signature by some, so not something you want anyone else in your area to have a similar one of. Worn around waist when too hot for otherwise, NEVER worn around neck, and if -for whatever reason- you're not wearing ANYTHING, they can be flung on the floor nearby wherever you are. Not generally meant for either sex, although if part of a couple, the dominant may prefer that the less-dominant wear his/her hoodie. If difficulty finding a unique hoodie, look in touristy shops next time you go on vacation

Yes, I KNOW I'm late, leave me alone!" she said, tightening her hoodie around her waist while frantically looking for her second boot.

http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=hoodie

**

Hoodies look like this.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 03:07 PM

Hey, Ivor!

Fyi, "What's happenin?" is a largely retired {at least among African Americans} colloquial greeting that basically means the same thing as "How are you?" and How'r ya doing and "What's up?"- meaning that these are frequently asked questions that are usually answered with a perfunctory remark like "Alright" or "Okay" or "Fine".

Though I don't at all mind you taking me literally, in day to day greetings, especially when people are greeting each other in a quick & in hurry kind of way, they don't usually share the good, bad and the ugly details of what is going on with them or what is going on in the world.

One response to "What's happenin? was- "Well, things have been rough but at least we're still in the land of the living".

That's my response today to that question.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 02:29 PM

well, Azizi, i just played Mahler 8 under Kubelik; it's cloudy here in sidewaystown Norwich; a lot of people have died in an earthquake in Peru; US banks have been given a lot of money because they didn't have enough !!!!!!!!!!!!!!; Japan's having a heatwave; and the people of Gloucester (or Tewksbury) have been having a protest march about plans to build loads more homes in flood-plains, not by hoodies, single mums, drug addicts or people on the dole, but builders, the government and other upright folk.

is that what you meant by 'What's happening?'? Or have I got the wrong end of the cheese?

Bestest of wishes to my first 'catter helper.






       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 09:26 AM

Hi,Don(Wyziwyg)T . You wrote I believe that the answer to your second question lies in the essential difference between our cultures."

Which question was that? {wwhich is probably a frequently asked question}.

**

Hi autolycus.

What's happening?

**

I'm not even gonna ask what PMB meant by his 17 Aug 07 - 08:51 AM post. That used to be a very common nickname you know. But times change, and the association with Cheney is certainly not helping that nickname.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: TheSnail
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 06:46 AM

Don(Wyziwyg)T

The English have for centuries had a particular penchant for getting out and about and exploring the world at large (and, truth to tell, grabbing large chunks of it for their own), which of course is why America is America rather than New Spain.

Eh?

America is named for Amerigo Vespucci, an Italian.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 18 Aug 07 - 06:31 AM

Hi Azizi,

We don't need to make heavy weather of this.

By "the outside world", I think we usually mean 'the world outside one's own country'.

If the English know a little more about the outside world than our American cousins, it's partly because we are a small country (so that the OW impinges on us; partly because we get a lot from the US, so we're aware of the OW that way; partly because we're not self-sufficient.

The US is far more self-sufficient (except in apple juice, apparently; oh, and maybe in oil?). Our cousins are also encouraged by many of the US institutions to believe that American is best in everything (and everything theat America is not best at doesn't get on the dial, e.g. formerly soccer), so who needs from the rest of the world. Except to teach them English, how to go WalMart, wear jeans, have democracy, and basically stop being different. So any lingering ignorance the average Joe (and Joess?) has about 'the outside world' is a lot based on a no-need-to-know basis.

Confusingly, the Americans are famed for travelling, especially to Europe as tourists, and, as in Shrub's case, for virtually never going abroad (as we wittily call it over here.)

Both the average English and Americans are pretty insular. Here, for example, there is sufficiently little about abroad on tv that I've heard of someone who thought there were no houses in Africa. That's because when Africa's countries get to the screen, it's usually about famine or war, so it is hard to tell from the goggle box that there is enormous development in that continent. And many get most of their, for want of a better word, 'knowledge', from the mass communications media.

Incidentally, anyone who "doesn't know anyone that ignorant of geography" is saying a lot about themselves and the types they attract to their circle. And the types they seive out. Unconsciously.







       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 17 Aug 07 - 02:07 PM

Hi Azizi.

I always use "suspect" and "suggest" rather than more positive terms, when I am expressing an opinion as opposed to stating a fact.

I believe that the answer to your second question lies in the essential difference between our cultures.

The English have for centuries had a particular penchant for getting out and about and exploring the world at large (and, truth to tell, grabbing large chunks of it for their own), which of course is why America is America rather than New Spain.

The Americans, on the contrary, have for many years tended toward isolationism. While allowing the people of the world at large to come to them, they were reluctant to become involved in what happened outside. Thus "Local" would be of greater interest than "Global".

As I said, purely my thoughts and opinions, and worth no more than whatever notice others choose to bestow.



Don T.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,PMB
Date: 17 Aug 07 - 08:51 AM

Mine turns to the left...


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 16 Aug 07 - 09:49 PM

Oh, btw, and fwiw, when I and people I know refer to Washington, DC we usually say "DC". {pronounced "Dee See"}.

DC stands for the District of Columbia, but I don't know anyone who says "Washington, District of Columbia".

When we are referring to a place called "Washington", we mean the US state.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Azizi
Date: 16 Aug 07 - 09:44 PM

Don(Wyziwyg)T, with regard to your comment that

The English have often been accused of being insular in their attitude to the outside world, but I suspect that the average UK citizen has a greater knowledge of the outside world than his average American cousin, and also a greater interest in it.,
maybe, maybe not. I think it depends on the meaning of the term the outside world.

I see that you said "suspect" as I don't know how research could be done to determine whether what you say is true or not.

But-here's a question for you [an infrequently asked question, no less]- if what you suspect is true, what are the reasons why the average UK citizen has a greater knowledge of the outside world than his average American cousin?

The mass media?

The education system?

I'm curious to "hear" your response/s.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 16 Aug 07 - 05:09 PM

It seems to me that this is a purely American idiosyncrasy.

In the UK, if we hear Washington mentioned, the vast majority think first of Washington D.C. I would suggest that the only people who would not might be those who live within ten miles of Washington, County Durham, and even they would only assume the local reference if it was mentioned by local rather than national media.

The same would apply to most major cities.

In the US the first thought seems to be of the local place, even in the case of cities as large and important as London and Paris.

The English have often been accused of being insular in their attitude to the outside world, but I suspect that the average UK citizen has a greater knowledge of the outside world than his average American cousin, and also a greater interest in it.

Don T.


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,Keinstein
Date: 16 Aug 07 - 05:25 AM

ignorami: The art of folding pieces of paper torn from mediaeval manuscripts?


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 15 Aug 07 - 06:44 PM

JiK and Ivor have just reminded me of some of the notions I encountered when I spent six months in Columbia, SC. In Oz, we're used to being distant from most of what people in other places regard as the centre of their various universes and we have to learn to understand 'where they're coming from', or at least where they think they're coming from. Having travelled in some interesting places outside Oz and even having visited some of the centres of the known universe (but not yet the USA) I was familiar with various notions of 'the centre vs the periphery' and how that affected both those people and my own sense of location.

It wasn't until I'd been in SC for a while that I became intimately aware of the particularly American version of Washington DC as the modern equivalent of Imperial Rome, with some aspects also of The Forbidden Palace in Beijing. It was only a couple of trivial items that pulled the scales from my eyes; both were part of the daily dead forest that lands on so many front porches in the US. One was describing Barossa Valley wines as the best wines from New Zealand and the other was a Lands End description of a woollen jumper (as we call them) as being made of the very finest Italian merino wool. For those not in the know, the Barossa Valley is just north of Adelaide in South Australia (I've not calculated how many thousand nautical miles west of New Zealand) and Italians wouldn't recognise a merino if it covered them (obscure agricultural jest) but they do buy our fine micron wool and spin really fine woollen yarn to make lovely clothes. Which they sell to the US and elsewhere. And most of the people reading the mail order catalogues know very little (and some care even less) where they come from so long as they can have them.

The same thing happened in Rome (the one with the Vatican) and is one of the marks of an imperial (not to suggest 'imperious') outlook. And before anyone gets too hot under the collar about my critique, which meant not unkindly, most Americans can't really be blamed. The social constructs by which they as individuals engage with the wider community highlight the local several orders of magnitude more powerfully than any engagement with the wider world outside USA. And this means it is very difficult for most of them (mere mortals like most of us) to come to grips with 'trivial' details of that outside world. And on top of that the differences in scale are huge; even in 1992 there were more military veterans (27 million, I recall) in the USA. That was almost 50% more than the entire population of Australia at that time.

So I suppose it's natural that not as many people in the USA as us outsiders might wish have the familiarity with and acceptance of the outside world that we say we'd like (and we've got our own ignorami too). Most 'catters I've read, by virtue of their interests in traditions and sources, I suspect, seem to be blessed. Long may it be so.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 15 Aug 07 - 12:48 PM

Regarding Rome, John; apart from US citizens who are Catholic, presumably.





       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 12 Aug 07 - 10:29 PM

London, England, and Paris, France is considered redundant ... ...

My DeLorme CD roadmap shows 17 "Londons" in the US in:

AL(2), AR, CA, IN, KS, KY, MI, MN(2), OH(2), PA, TN, TX, WI, WV.

Paris could mean any of 27 places in:

AR, CA, IA(3), ID, IL, IN, KS, KY, MD, ME, MI, MO, MS, NH, NY, OH(2), OR(2), PA, SC, TN, TX, VA, WI

Even Cairo and Rome each appears in 22 different places here.

For a large portion of the US population, when you say "Rome" without specific other qualification, it always means Rome, NY - the locale for Griffiss AFB, which is a major training, research, and maintenance base where, seemingly, everyone who's ever been in the US Air Force has "done some time."

John


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 12 Aug 07 - 06:15 PM

Autolycus, I suspect your "Was that too provocative or not provocative enough?" might qualify as an infrequently asked question, but I suggest your

"Hm?"
is one of the most frequently-asked questions going.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 11 Aug 07 - 12:10 PM

Was that too provocative or not provocative enough?


Hm?





      Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 10 Aug 07 - 05:52 PM

How far does the fault lie with the public?






       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 09 Aug 07 - 06:27 PM

And spoil it?
Nah!

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Liz the Squeak
Date: 09 Aug 07 - 01:53 AM

Rowan - warn a body before you post stories like that one!!

LTS


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 08 Aug 07 - 10:39 PM

A story from my days at Mawson was told about Repstat (the replacement for Wilkes that was later named Casey) was that the station doctor knew all the medical details of the (entirely male) expeditioners and consequently knew who was and who wasn't circumcised. Over drinks in the mess he frequently advertised his ability to perform such an operation with "I only charge a slab", meaning two dozen cans of (rationed) beer, the universal ANARE currency.

After a while and still early in the year, the cook decided to take him up on his offer, providing he could keep the detached item in a jar; "i'm out of circulation for the year anyway" was his justification. After the op. he kept the jar, labelled and preserving the item in ethanol, prominently displayed on a shelf in the kitchen. It became the subject of ongoing jokes.

The cook was also often the butt of jokes about his cooking ability until one evening, quite late in the year, when he served up a magnificent stew that was universally praised. When he was asked what he had done to improve his cooking he said nothing but just pointed to the shelf; the jar was there, in its usual place, but empty.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Amos
Date: 08 Aug 07 - 07:19 PM

I bet the surgeon was annoyed at losing his tip, though.


A


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 08 Aug 07 - 06:23 PM

Thanks, Ivor; another of those senior moments I suspect.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: autolycus
Date: 08 Aug 07 - 10:20 AM

rowan, you're the only one who can answer that.

   Unless it was 'cos they were both popular in the early - mid 50s.





       Ivor


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: frogprince
Date: 08 Aug 07 - 09:30 AM

How long do they deep-fry the foreskins before they sack them up and label them as "pork rinds"?


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: Cluin
Date: 08 Aug 07 - 12:09 AM

What the hell is this?


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST,Art Thieme
Date: 07 Aug 07 - 09:34 PM

So, my question is...

When a guy is born with one eye lid, what can be done?

art


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Subject: RE: BS: Infrequently Asked Questions
From: GUEST
Date: 07 Aug 07 - 09:31 PM

My friend was born with one eye lid. When he was circumcised they grafted it on. He's fine. Just a little cockeyed.

Art Thieme


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