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Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!

Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Dec 09 - 05:03 PM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 28 Dec 09 - 04:37 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Dec 09 - 04:09 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Dec 09 - 04:05 PM
beeliner 28 Dec 09 - 03:46 PM
beeliner 28 Dec 09 - 03:34 PM
Tootler 28 Dec 09 - 03:34 PM
Q (Frank Staplin) 28 Dec 09 - 02:57 PM
Songbob 27 Dec 09 - 05:09 PM
katlaughing 04 Nov 09 - 02:13 PM
Bettynh 04 Nov 09 - 11:20 AM
GUEST,guest 04 Nov 09 - 08:31 AM
kendall 04 Nov 09 - 07:13 AM
GUEST,Mr Red 04 Nov 09 - 06:17 AM
oldhippie 03 Nov 09 - 07:57 PM
GUEST,merrius 03 Nov 09 - 11:16 AM
GUEST,TJ in San Diego 06 Jul 07 - 02:47 PM
moongoddess 14 Dec 06 - 06:44 PM
Bugsy 14 Dec 06 - 06:04 PM
Gurney 01 Dec 06 - 01:42 AM
Desert Dancer 30 Nov 06 - 08:13 PM
OtherDave 30 Nov 06 - 06:06 PM
Bugsy 29 Nov 06 - 07:52 PM
GUEST,Ancient Briton 21 Nov 06 - 01:20 PM
The Fooles Troupe 21 Nov 06 - 08:16 AM
The Fooles Troupe 21 Nov 06 - 08:10 AM
Bugsy 21 Nov 06 - 02:42 AM
GUEST,Scoville at Dad's 19 Nov 06 - 03:06 PM
The Fooles Troupe 19 Nov 06 - 05:48 AM
Don(Wyziwyg)T 15 Nov 06 - 09:22 AM
Bugsy 14 Nov 06 - 08:31 PM
GUEST,thurg 14 Nov 06 - 06:32 PM
Bernard 14 Nov 06 - 06:18 PM
GUEST 14 Nov 06 - 11:24 AM
GUEST 13 Nov 06 - 01:27 PM
Uncle_DaveO 13 Nov 06 - 12:57 PM
GUEST,thurg 13 Nov 06 - 09:09 AM
katlaughing 13 Nov 06 - 02:29 AM
JohnInKansas 13 Nov 06 - 01:57 AM
John O'L 13 Nov 06 - 01:16 AM
katlaughing 13 Nov 06 - 12:50 AM
Lin in Kansas 12 Nov 06 - 11:16 PM
GUEST,E.B. White 12 Nov 06 - 10:42 PM
Uncle_DaveO 12 Nov 06 - 08:35 PM
Scooby Doo 12 Nov 06 - 03:37 PM
GUEST 12 Nov 06 - 03:24 PM
Mbo 14 Apr 00 - 09:21 PM
wildwoodflower 14 Apr 00 - 09:01 PM
Jim Dixon 14 Apr 00 - 04:30 PM
wysiwyg 14 Apr 00 - 03:14 PM
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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 05:03 PM

I seem to remember that Al Capp used the rag off'n the bush expression in Li'l Abner.
TJ's explanation is reasonable; I remember the old trick of changing the direction of a signpost, or changing the blaze on a tree.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 04:37 PM

He's got more -- than Carter's got pills.
Hotter'n a two-dollar pistol
Hotter than Kelsie's nuts
Dry as a popcorn fart
(Something) went over like a fart in a space suit (or diving bell)
Slicker than a newborn weasel (or snot on a doorknob)

The problem with these things is that they are low-hanging fruit for
free association - they just keep on comin'.

And a really old western (Colorado?) expression, "Well, don't that take the rag off the bush, though?" The best explanation I've heard for that one relates to crude trail markers left by scouts for those following - a piece of cloth (rag)tied to the branch of a shrub or limb of chaparral. If someone wanted to screw things up royally, they had only to "take the rag off the bush."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 04:09 PM

Drop a clanger- commit a faux pas. Also clangeroo.

Clampers- hands. How many terms? Mitts, dukes, etc.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 04:05 PM

The old word cater, or catercorner, gets revised every which way but up (kittycorner, etc.).

Catawampus has a long history and several meanings and spellings. Dates refer to first known appearance in print.
-vigorously or completely. 1834
-vigorously chewed up. Douglass 1857
-a peculiar or remarkable thing. 1833
-ferocious. 1843
-to confuse, injure, or damage. 1839
-to move diagonally. 1902 (derived from catercorner)


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: beeliner
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 03:46 PM

Correction: make that Runs in Pennsylvania,
Drains in Michigan and parts of Ontario.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: beeliner
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 03:34 PM

Creeks in Illinois but pronounced 'crick'.
Runs in Michigan.
Drains in parts of Ontario.

Oklahoma: 'Straight-up' for 'o'clock'. "I get off work at straight-up five." Can also refer to the second hand in precise measurements. "It's straight-up 4:23."

"Jumbo" is bologna in Pittsburghese.

In Illinois, "kittycorner" or "kattycorner" for 'diagonally opposite'. "Kattywampus" for 'at an odd angle or position'. "No wonder it doesn't work, you've got the part in kattywampus."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Tootler
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 03:34 PM

Growing up just north of Boston, I called small streams of running water brooks.

Where I live in North Yorkshire, they are "becks". The same word is used in Cumbria. The word is Scandinavian in origin. I did a translation check in Google and brook is:

"bekk" in Norwegian
"bäck" in Swedish and
"bæk" in Danish

Same word.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Q (Frank Staplin)
Date: 28 Dec 09 - 02:57 PM

"Let's hire it up." Add spice or other flavoring to stew, etc. Georgia.
"He's got more money (or whatever) than a carter's got oats." Old Georgia. Carter = wagoneer or trucker.

Catercorner. In a diagonal or oblique position. Very old word, originated in England. Wide use in the U. S.; not a colloquialism (See Oxford English Dictionary and Webster's Collegiate); English usage from 1577, as Cater where it also appears as Catercross and Caterways.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Songbob
Date: 27 Dec 09 - 05:09 PM

This discussion of localisms and how England and America are two countries divided by a common language leads me to one of my favorite lines from a song, q.v., "Monday Morning," by Cyril Tawney:

Where has the weekend gone?
Where is the wine and beer I tasted?
Gone the same way as the pay I wasted [i.e., pissed away]
On a Monday morning.

Such a subtle use of a colloquialism, and one that probably slips through the consciousness of most listeners. I love it!



BTW, in Appalachia and parts of the midwest, "crick" is used in place of "creek," at least when spoken. My family used it regularly, in Des Moines, but then they came by way of Tennessee, 'way back. And there were three pronunciations of "root, as well.

Someone asked about "runs," which is most common in Virginia and West-By-God, though I don't know about neighboring states like N.C. and Tennessee.

Pronunciations:
The part of a tree is root -- think "ruit," OR "rute";
The highway is a route -- think "rowt" OR "rute";
And the pigs would root -- think "rute" -- in the ground. So there was overlap in some pronunciations, particularly for roads, but the verb was always "rute." I never heard of pigs "ruiting" or "rowting."

Bob


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: katlaughing
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 02:13 PM

They are cricks in the West, too, at least in Colorado. I think that probably came from Southern ancestors, though.

Anyone know where "Billy, be damned" came from. My sister still using it as in " The wind was blowing like billy be damned!"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Bettynh
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 11:20 AM

Growing up just north of Boston, I called small streams of running water brooks.

I know they're kills in southeastern New York (Dutch, right?). They're creeks or criks in the south? Is Bull Run one of these? If so, where are they called runs? Any other names for small running waterways?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,guest
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 08:31 AM

My favourite from my childhood in Glasgow, My mum never swore and when me and my siblings had exasperated her to retalliation, she would say "Awa tae Banff!!" Although I never quite worked out why a pretty north-east town would be somewhere you would want to banish your children - although it is quite a long way from Glasgow....:)


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: kendall
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 07:13 AM

Man to friend whose wife just had a 3 pound baby, "Hell, man, you just about got your bait back".

To indicate far away, Way the hell and gone...

Rough wea5ther...Savagrus.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,Mr Red
Date: 04 Nov 09 - 06:17 AM

Our Black Country family used to used the word

tranklements,
noun usually used in the plural. these are the ephemera that burden you, cannot throw out, but are by and large without useful function. eg jewelery.

The ceilidhnauts of England refer to their genre as
E-Ceilidh, specifically English Ceilidh.
Dances can be from anywhere but are most likely to be from England &/or written here. Because we are English. Ranting and Hornpipe steps are common, unlike (say) Scottish dancing where Hornpipes don't exist and Ranting means telling the E-Cailidh dancers that stray into Scottish Dances that they should stand still until they are required to move instead of bopping all the time! And improvisation is not a feature of Scottish Dancing (or English Country dancing much neither).

Ducks and runs for cover.................


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: oldhippie
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 07:57 PM

I have a tie clip from the 70s that reads "YCDBSOYA" which stands for "You Can't Do Business Sitting On Your Ass"

One of my favorites is "emuff" (pronounced eee-muff) - short for english muffin; "I'll have eggs scrambled, bacon and an emuff with butter and jam."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,merrius
Date: 03 Nov 09 - 11:16 AM

Related to SNAFU, there's:

TARFU---things are REALLY fucked up

and

FUBAR---fucked up beyond all recognition


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,TJ in San Diego
Date: 06 Jul 07 - 02:47 PM

I grew up in California's San Joaquin Valley, where many of the residents had moved from Oklahoma, Arkansas and Texas, among other places, back in the 1930's and '40's. Some of what they contributed to the language -

Speaking of bad behavior:
"That's lower'n a snake's belly in a wagon track."

Ugly woman:
"I wouldn't take her to dog fight if I knew she could win!"

Bullshit:
"Horse pucky!" "Road apples!"

Fast:
"Quicker'n goose shit through a tin horn!" (which made it all the way into a line from "The Best Little Whorehouse in Texas," a famous Broadway musical.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: moongoddess
Date: 14 Dec 06 - 06:44 PM

Well now, I live in RI where the colloquillisms run rampant. Thank you MMario and Barbara for reminding me of the reference to making out as "watching the submarine races". In North Kingstown, RI, where I grew up, we REALLY DID watch the submarine races when we made out. We went to the beach and looked at the bay where real submarines were lurking about, thanks to the US Navy.
We call people in RI who live in "the sticks" Swamp Yankees", meaning their heritage goes way back to the first settlers. They don't need and they don't subscribe to modern ways of living. Then there are the Italian immigrants and their descendants on Federal Hill. If someone disappears on "the Hill" you just say, "and there he was, gone!". If he was gone in a very suspicious way, maybe he was wearing "a cement overcoat" and took a swim in Narragansett Bay.
I love Rhode Island!
Diana


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Bugsy
Date: 14 Dec 06 - 06:04 PM

No one?

Nuffin?

'Baht Nora?



Cheers


Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Gurney
Date: 01 Dec 06 - 01:42 AM

Sydneysiders have their own rhyming slang, different from(or to) the London version. Two I remember : Septic. = American. (Septic tank) Horses. = Homosexuals. (Horses hoofs, poofs.)

If a Kiwi says "You can put a ring around that!" it means s/he agrees wholeheartedly.

The matelots of both RN and RNZN refer to their respective airforces as 'Crabs,' due to the colour of their uniform being similar to an ointment used for venereal infestations. "I'm flying home on Crab Airways."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Desert Dancer
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 08:13 PM

From: GUEST,JULIE - PM
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 12:03 PM

'...we moved to Yorkshire and my mother couldn't get used to the "are you alright" as the opening greeting.'

Oh! That explains it! (Maybe...) I have a coworker who's from Manchester, whose father is from Durham: she often greets me with "you alright?" and I've always wondered if I looked like I wasn't!

~ Becky in Tucson, Arizona


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: OtherDave
Date: 30 Nov 06 - 06:06 PM

It's a manufactured colloquialism, but I won't let that stop me... a remembered bit of Marshall Dodge, New England humorist, speaking in a solid-maple Maine drawl, a farmer talking about the newly arrived child of neighbors...

"I could take a sharp knife and a piece of knotty pine, and whittle a better-looking baby than those two made..."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Bugsy
Date: 29 Nov 06 - 07:52 PM

Thanks a bunch Foolstroupe.

So? No one ELSE don't know nuffin' 'baht Nora????


CHeers


Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,Ancient Briton
Date: 21 Nov 06 - 01:20 PM

Fools round here are sometimes said to have the brain of a chocolate pig. The sound of a cheap banjo was once described as being like a rat in a biscuit tin. Newcomers feigining affluence are described as tuppenny millionaires. Brown and white horses are described a coloured osses. Americans (even those from the deepest south) are referred to as Yanks. Narrow pathways between buildings are called ginnels (but to the east of the district sometimes snickets). Peat bogs are called hags. Lady sheep are called yows and young cattle coves. Baby horses are foiles and adult cattle are beasts (pronounced bee-yasts). Boots are booits. You are called thee and when you're instructed to do something, the address is thou mun (verb)... (pronounced tha'mn...)

No prizes for guessing where.

AB


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 21 Nov 06 - 08:16 AM

QUOTE
like state a booktitle and have the other one guess the name of the author...
"Yellow river" by a male Irish author ? I P Daily...or,
"Baby's revenge" by a female russian author ? Nora Titoff :-)...

UNQUOTE


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 21 Nov 06 - 08:10 AM

I said - "Nora Titoff"


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Bugsy
Date: 21 Nov 06 - 02:42 AM

So? No one don't know nuffin' 'baht Nora????


CHeers


Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,Scoville at Dad's
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 03:06 PM

In Texas it's New OR-leans, usually run together so it sounds like one word (nuORlins). And it's not a PEE-can (can, as in the tin thing in which you buy beans), but a pe-CAHN, that we put in pies.

I had a college classmate from Milwaukee who asked where the "bubbler" (drinking fountain) was. I had never heard this, but my New Jerseyite mother said she had, although she and her friends didn't use it regularly as children.

We've also got "icehouses", which are like semi-outdoor bars (some are more like convenience stores that sell a lot of alcohol)--they often have garage doors in the walls. I believe it's derived from the practice of storing and selling alcohol from literal icehouses back when we had them (although I don't know where you'd have a real icehouse this far south since you'd never have any ice to store in it).

Rebel-Yankee Language Test. Ha ha! I scored 81% Southern, which surprises me since I learned to talk from my decidedly Yankee parents, even though I've lived on the Gulf Coast for the best part of my life.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: The Fooles Troupe
Date: 19 Nov 06 - 05:48 AM

"es anyone know the origins, or who "Nora" was??"

Nora Titoff, that Russian Lady Writer, I suspect...


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Don(Wyziwyg)T
Date: 15 Nov 06 - 09:22 AM

A couple of my favourites:


"She's got the kind of personality that makes everyone she meets want to shake her warmly by the throat"

"There's nowt wrong wi' 'im as couldn't be cured by slittin' 'is throat"

Don T.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Bugsy
Date: 14 Nov 06 - 08:31 PM

My neice has been asking me about "Bloody Nora" or "Flippin'Nora" or "Flamin' Nora" or even "F*$#ing Nora".

Does anyone know the origins, or who "Nora" was??


Cheers


Bugsy


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,thurg
Date: 14 Nov 06 - 06:32 PM

"He's a fine lad, but he'd be none the worse for a hanging."

Someone in the family used to say this - but I have this uncomfortable notion that it might have come from Dickens somewhere. Anyone?


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Bernard
Date: 14 Nov 06 - 06:18 PM

He's that mean he wouldn't give a door a slam...

Bugger the expense - throw the cat another canary!

He's a good lad, but his boots are tight...


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST
Date: 14 Nov 06 - 11:24 AM

With reference to unruly children; What ee needs is a slammin good lugwinder. Or to the parents of said children; you mus cobble up yer hounds. Old Nova Scotia, grand but not heard much anymore.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 01:27 PM

Someone who is quite mean when it comes to spending their money is referred to as being, "As tight as a fishes arse" in my neck of the woods. (Newcastle) Similarly, "He could peel an orange in his pocket."
       Someone lacking refinement or manners can also be labelled as being, "As rough as a badger's arse."


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 12:57 PM

I'm not really sure whether these are "colloquialisms", as specified by Kat, but they are speech peculiarities, and might be interesting.

Here in Indiana we have a number of place names that are familiar, but "different".

Milan, a town in southern Indiana, is not pronounced like its Italian forebear. It's "MY-luhn".    Milan, Michigan has this same distinction.

Lafayette is SOMETIMES pronounced like the famous Marquis, but it's not too unusual to hear it pronounced "Lay-fee-ette". Or even "La-FAY-ette".

Orleans, in Orleans County, Indiana, is not pronounced like the second word in "New OR-luhns". It's definitely, and always, "Or-LEENS".

Terre Haute, Indiana (meaning "high ground"), ought to and many times is pronounced "TAIR-uh Hote", but it often loses the second syllable of "Terre" to become "Tair Hote". And worse, "Tair Hut". Or, for conscious humor, "Terrible Hut".

Then (not a pronunciation matter, but of interest), there's a "Needmore, Indiana". In fact there's another one of that name in the state. No, there are actually two more, for a total of three Needmores in Indiana. I guess someone thought we needed more or them.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,thurg
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 09:09 AM

"failure to use the pronunciation appropriate to the street side one was on seemed to spark deeply smoldering emotions."

This is really funny - and reassures us, if that's the right way of putting it, that people are the same the world over.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: katlaughing
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 02:29 AM

LOL, JohninKS, my mom went to "hen parties" though it was my dad who called them such! And, Massachusetts was still that way, in the 80's and 90's, about pronouncing things oddly differently.:-)


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 01:57 AM

Having read this entire thread in one sitting, having made copious notes on the expressions that came to mind, and then having seen all my offerings demolished by subsequent posts, I'm left with little to say.

In my own inimitable style of brevity and terse wit, this probably won't take more than a couple of pages...

An almost ancient expression that I heard used in my youngest rememberable days was "musta seen the elephant."

The derivation is quite well known. Mammoth fossils had been found in the Kansas Territory shortly before the opening of the Territory for settlement, and the imaginings of many settlers enroute invented all kinds of "great beasts," possibly still roaming about, and threats that "the elephant 'll get you" probably kept lots of youngsters on their best behaviour. "He saw the elephant" became the somewhat cryptic description for one who didn't make it as a homesteader - i.e. who gave up and went "back East."

The very few instances in which a couple of elders used the term were cases where someone "packed up and left," nearly always under some recognized "trial" (of circumstance or reputation).

"Like a duck on a junebug" has been mentioned, but it's perhaps worth noting that the term can refer to any "surprisingly eager" act, or as in the case of the DI, as a threat.

"Been beat with an ugly stick" usually applied to females, but I've heard it used in applications to males. The meaning probably is obvious enough. "Took a second dose of ugly" is a variation(?) "Fell out of an ugly tree and hit every branch on the way down" is another, sometimes as "hit every branch when she fell out of the ugly tree."

"Choke the duck" means go take a piss. "Duck" is an obvious corruption of "duct" as I've heard it used by many, more obviously in the variant "Drain my duck."

"Subtle as cow pissin' on a flat rock" needs no explanation.

A "Hen Party" was, a generation or two ago, a womens' meeting, most often a quilting bee or ladies society (i.e. organized) meeting. The term probably still pops up, but isn't as common. The term "Biddie Bitch" was also very rarely used - only during periods when there were "nasty rumors" in circulation. The less kind version usually reflected an opinion that an opportunity to gossip about a particular rumor was the real subject of the meeting, and was "pretty strong speaking" for those I heard use it.

I can assert that on the banks of the Charles River (Cambridge MA) in the late 50s and early 60s, necking on the riverbank was called "taking her to watch the submarine races."

I can also confirm that Worcester MA was called "Wooster" by native New Englanders in the same era; but Dorcester MA was NOT called "Dooster." I lived for a little over a year in Dorcester, on a street spelled on the street sign at one end of the block "Rosseter" and pronounced "ROSS-i-ter" by all those living on the West side of the street. The sign at the other end of the block spelled it "Rosetter" and all those on the East side of the street pronounced it "Rose-ET-er." I never inquired about the difference of opinion, but failure to use the pronunciation appropriate to the street side one was on seemed to spark deeply smoldering emotions.

A short distance up the road was a "traffic circle" (roundabout?) named for a famous Revolutionary hero. Five streets entered the circle, each with a sign spelling the name of the hero differently, two signs within the circle spelled it two additional ways, and the monument in the middle was marked with a bronze plate providing an eighth spelling (Kosciuszko Circle, Dorchester MA - I picked a spelling at random.)

Some of the info on "odd pronunciations" of place names probably seem a little less "potent" to me after my "Dorchester period."

Trade jargon, US: "Where's the dutchmans?" means someone is looking for a pair of "compound-lever, toothed-jawed sheetmetal shears." So named because most of them in WWII aircraft production days at least were made by "Deutsch & Co."

Trade jargon again: "What did you do with the dyke's" meant the "diagonal cutter pliers" (wire cutters) had been misplaced.

"Carrying a loose load" probably came from the same place as "Three bricks shy of a load" or "A few marbles short of a bagful" or any number of other descriptions of "incomplete (or unused) mental capacity." There are a lot of these but calling them up without specific contexts to jog my failing memory is beyond me at the moment. Maybe "a few straws fell out of my bale."

The difference between "kluge" or "kludge" (UK: rhymes with "fudge" - usually derogatory) and "cluge" or "cludge" (US: rhymes with "huge" - frequently a back-handed compliment) could be discussed, but it's in the Hackers' Dictionary.

John


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: John O'L
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 01:16 AM

The only time I've heard it was in a Tom Waits song as "colder than a well-digger's ass". I thought he made it up. It's kinda disappointing but pleasing at the same time to find it's a folk saying.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: katlaughing
Date: 13 Nov 06 - 12:50 AM

Thanks, Linn. I think the refresh may have been part of a spam attack, bt it's still fun to see it back up.BTW, I'd always heard it "colder than a well-digger's ass."

I find myself using one of my dad's, these days, "double tough" meaning excatly what it says. It was high praise coming from him, usually in reference to an ancestor.

Guest, E.B. White...using *smile* or even **bg** is a good way of furthering communication in the cyberworld where one cannot see the facial expressions of those they *visit* with, imo. I don't think we are so attached as just wanting to be clear as to the intent of our words. Just my opinion, of course.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Lin in Kansas
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 11:16 PM

In Texas, anyone from another state or a far-flung place was probably from "Bumfuck Egypt."

Winters were/are "colder than a well-digger's belt buckle," or maybe "cold as a witch's tit," or possibly referred to a brass monkey's anatomy in various ways.

"Over yonder" was simply "a ways over there." Could also be "see yonder cow in that field?"

"Down the road a ways" meant a little farther on.

Might be "on you like a duck on a Junebug," or "like stink on sh*t."

And "Y'all come back, y'hear?" really does get used a lot there. More than one person is nearly always "y'all."

One I always liked was "If they stuffed your brain up a monkey's butt, it would still rattle like a BB in a freight car." (Usually yelled at my next oldest brother... as long as my mom wasn't around.)

In Washington state, place names lie in wait for the unwary all over. There are many Native American names for towns, such as Puyallup (PEW-allup, not POOEY-allup) or Sequim (took me years to figure out it was pronounced "Skwim," not SEE-quim).

Whoever refreshed this thread, thanks! And thanks to Katlaughing for starting it. It's been a fun one to read. And BTW, Missouri is not Missoura, it's Miz-ZUR-a!

Lin in Kansas


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST,E.B. White
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 10:42 PM

Some folks, when they mean to indicate positive regard, "punctuate" their prose with stuff like **smile** and **grin**.

Wish they'd quit it, but I realise they're attached to it.

It's just cheesy is all.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Uncle_DaveO
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 08:35 PM

Lonesome EJ, (more than six years ago!!!) said:

yonder. It describes a specific visible point ("do you see that magnolia tree yonder?"or "do you see yonder Magnolia tree?"), or a general area ("the best fishing is yonder behind those hills").

On the other hand, "over yonder" can mean the after-life, Heaven.

Dave Oesterreich


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Scooby Doo
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 03:37 PM

It should have been all deleted Mudelf!!!!!!!
Scooby


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: GUEST
Date: 12 Nov 06 - 03:24 PM

'Em!............Fun!

Thanks for the PM, Bernard. I had already deleted it, and those that followed. Folks, this references a spam post that had already been dealt with. I have removed the following posts that referenced it. Mudelf


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Mbo
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 09:21 PM

Cool wildwood! I am just 10 minutes away from Camp Lejuene as we speak! That's "Luh-zhoon", or in the original French "Luh-zhun", but around here folks say "Luh-joon", "luh-zhern".

--Mbo


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: wildwoodflower
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 09:01 PM

I believe the word "Wallah" mentioned by many as being an Indian (Hindi) phrase may be one and the same with the Arabic phrase, "Wallah" or "Wallahi", which means literally, "By God", used as we would say "I swear" or used when replying in astonishment, such as "Really?"

My daddy was from (the "boonies", the sticks") Gibson Co., TN (I say that with a smile). and he had some funny expressions. Here's a few he used and we used growing up (we grew up in Hermitage, a suburb of Nashville, i.e. the "boonies" of Nashville"):

Coke, or "Co-co-la" -ANY softdrink, not just Coca-Cola or Coca-Cola products, Pepsi too.

"Bri-ches"- my daddy never wore pants, trousers or slacks, just "bri-ches", the ones with his suit were just fancy "bri-ches".

Dad always liked to have a "swig" of coffee or iced tea.

"Sweet-tea" may as well be one word.

"What in Sam's Hill!" -i.e., What the Hell. I always though Sam's Hill was an actual place. It must be "over yonder" -an unspecified distance.

"Doomafloggy", "Dohicky", "Thingamabob"- unknown object. -does anyone else use "doomafloggy"? I don't think I've ever heard anyone else use it.

We also use the expression "carry", such as "Carry me to the Kroger's or Krystal's", notice the "'s" on the end of Kroger and Krystal ("the" before Kroger's and Krystal's is optional). Don't know why.

Nothing is pronounced they way it probably should be around here. "Shell-bee-ville (Shellybyville)" is "She-ba-vul", "Lu-wee-ville" is in fact (ha!) "Lua-vul", "Leb-anon" is "Lebnun" and what should seem to be "O-bee-on" County is "Obi(short "i")n". Memphis is "Mem-fus". My mother, whose parents grew up in the midwest, pronouces Missouri "Missoura". One of my professors called Raleigh, Memphis, "East Jesus"- he was from the north.

"Do whut?" is a popular expression.

"perty" -pretty

"How come" and "Why come" replace "how can it be" and "why is it".

When we were children, if we didn't drink our milk we were told we'd, "dry up and blow away".

"tee-niny" -really small.

"slowpoke"- no doubt from my midwestern maternal grandfather who homesteaded out in California.

"You better pack a lunch 'cause it's gonna take all day!"-my dad said this in reply to an obnoxious drunk in a truckstop who tried to provoke him to fight. A classic!

"I'm gonna be on you like a duck on a june bug!" -Major Beale, 2nd Mar Div, Camp Lejeune, NC., USMC.

"Copycat" -someone who mocks someone else, someone who "copied" someone else -silly!

"Goofball"- silly person.

"Cornball"- dry humor. I'm sure I'll think of more.

Next, someone should start a thread on CB radio expressions.


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: Jim Dixon
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 04:30 PM

There is another branch to this thread! Click here!


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Subject: RE: Colloquialisms- Post & Define 'Em! Fun!
From: wysiwyg
Date: 14 Apr 00 - 03:14 PM

[Boofoo] = [Butt-F**k] = [Super-Boonies] = [west of where God lost his underwear]

[skimpy glimmers] = a term mudcat friends have used to try discussing a spiritual event perceived with human understanding

[Lombosis] = an imaginary (??) disease which is always terminal but never fatal, signified by the onset of Nod Disease, falling asleep in work clothes in the chair at home.

[Portagee] = trying to talk when too tired to form language properly in the brain but something sounding almost like a real language comes out the mouth


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