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BS: Lizzie - dyslexia

GUEST,Mary Brennan 03 May 07 - 06:02 PM
JohnInKansas 03 May 07 - 06:42 PM
Mrrzy 04 May 07 - 09:53 AM
Donuel 04 May 07 - 10:18 AM
RangerSteve 04 May 07 - 02:34 PM
Donuel 05 May 07 - 11:48 AM
Willie-O 06 May 07 - 09:05 AM
Bobert 06 May 07 - 09:37 AM
Ebbie 07 May 07 - 12:42 AM
leeneia 07 May 07 - 10:38 AM
Folkiedave 07 May 07 - 02:05 PM
dianavan 08 May 07 - 03:35 AM
GUEST 08 May 07 - 03:49 AM
GUEST,Cats 08 May 07 - 04:09 AM
GUEST,Chris Murray 08 May 07 - 08:43 AM
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Subject: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: GUEST,Mary Brennan
Date: 03 May 07 - 06:02 PM

I thought you'd enjoy this. I know you still lurk. It's written by a journalist with severe dyslexia.

http://www.timesonline.co.uk/tol/life_and_style/food_and_drink/a_a_gill/article1600528.ece


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: JohnInKansas
Date: 03 May 07 - 06:42 PM

A Link.


John


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Mrrzy
Date: 04 May 07 - 09:53 AM

Histerycal!


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Donuel
Date: 04 May 07 - 10:18 AM

eh it wasn't my kettle of fish.


What annoys me about dyselxia is that normal reading requires enormous effort and induces severe fatigue and headache, while writing does not.

Being wired differently is something that people I meet, pick up within a minute. The difference is often interpreted by the educationally uninitiated as bad, evil, non conformist or most often unitelligent, awkward and verbally deficient.

Like the author of the article I too have nothing to say regarding celebrating dyslexia.

However I would have opened with "The Queer old Dean is visiting the Kentucky Derby today."


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: RangerSteve
Date: 04 May 07 - 02:34 PM

You mean the Kenterby Ducky, don't you?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Donuel
Date: 05 May 07 - 11:48 AM

AA Gill, Would you be interested in a job at the White House as the official taster?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Willie-O
Date: 06 May 07 - 09:05 AM

They could call it the Kenterby Ducky, but no, they had to go all high-falutin and change the name to "The Run For The Roses".

They just couldn't call it "Kentucky" anymore, unless they paid royalties to the Commonwealth of same, which has trademarked the use of the name. God forbid that a rich horse race should contribute to the common coffers. Same reason the Fried Chicken Formerly Known As Kentucky became KFC. (The rumour that they couldn't legally call it "Chicken" anymore due to genetic modification is a myth).


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Bobert
Date: 06 May 07 - 09:37 AM

Ummmmm, bein' lexdexic myself, I couldn't get past the first couple of paragraphs but...

I'll go back to it later...an' later... it might take several "goin' backs" but I will get it read...

I think???

Bobert


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Ebbie
Date: 07 May 07 - 12:42 AM

Segue: Am I missing something here? I'm so literal minded that I never know- but I have to say it- They still call it the Kentucky Derby; it is also called Churchill Downs, for the location, and also 'The Run for the Roses' because of the rose blanket the winning horse is draped with. Are you guys being facetious?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: leeneia
Date: 07 May 07 - 10:38 AM

I read a book once by a woman whose son, born about 1950, was dyslexic. She showed an actual page he had written about age 9. He had written "London" as "Nlodno."

Yes, he moved the N to the front and capitalized it, and his brain could not detect the difference. To me that was the great mystery and heartbreak of serious dyslexia.

He could not be allowed to ride a bike because he could not control whether he turned right or left. ie, if he wanted to turn right into a side street, he was just as likely to turn left into traffic.

Eventually someone provided him a typewriter. For some reason, he got much better results on a typewriter.

Anyone with serious dyslexia has my sympathy.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: Folkiedave
Date: 07 May 07 - 02:05 PM

I have taught people with dyslexia for a number of years.

I used to take students to N. Wales on a residential for a week designed to assist with group cohesion. One student was severely dyslexic and up to that point the others had tended to avoid him since he had difficulty contributing to group work.

Once we got to the bit on the residential when the students had problems to solve, (get across Bala using a 50 gallon oil drum and a paper clip sort of thing) James could not see why it was a problem and could solve those trials as a matter of course!! He soon became the person in most demand.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: dianavan
Date: 08 May 07 - 03:35 AM

First of all, all children have left to right confusion and difficulty sequencing. Thats why they have teachers. Its maturational and since all children mature at different rates, its not really a problem unless the reversals persist beyond grade 2.

It is also related to anxiety so the worst thing parents and teachers can do is make a big deal of it. Its actually easy to correct in the early years. You calmly tell the child that if he reverses letter/numbers or sequences incorrectly, you will write the correct form and they can trace over the top for practice. Assure them that eventually they will 'get the hang of it'. As long as nobody makes a big deal about, the 'problem' corrects itself.

In fifteen years of teaching, I have only seen one child that could be termed dyslexic and with keyboards and calculators, whats the big deal?


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: GUEST
Date: 08 May 07 - 03:49 AM

I think there are issues around kids (and adults) who haven't had the sort of early intervention dianavan describes now being slapped with the dyslexic label at the drop of a hat. It was frightening, the number of universty students I taught who were dyslexic - having had to do training in dyslexia awareness as part of my job, I'd question the diagnosis in at least half the students I taught who allegedly had it.

My ex-husband, who writes for the same paper as AA Gill, used to tell me how the subs moaned at how awful Gill's spelling and punctuation were, and what a nightmare it was to work on his pieces...he clearly hadn't made his dyslexia common knowledge, and everyone just thought he was a bit crap.

I guess they know now.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: GUEST,Cats
Date: 08 May 07 - 04:09 AM

I teach students who are Dyslexic. We identify them early, they have a card which informs any supply teachers and asks for extra time in which to do their work. In the Dyslexia support groups we talk openly about why they work as they do and celebrate all they are good at. We have dyslexia days where they can all work together on a range of activities and are given specific help on any aspect they need. We teach personal learning strategies, organisational and thinking skills, ways to research and prepare for exams. We celebrate logical and 3D thinking. Some have overlays, some coloured glasses, some neither. But every child matters and we make sure that they know that. It's not hidden here, it's celebrated.


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Subject: RE: BS: Lizzie - dyslexia
From: GUEST,Chris Murray
Date: 08 May 07 - 08:43 AM

The 'label' of dyslexia does tend to be given to kids who are just poor at spelling and writing. Most teachers have had no training at all how to recognise and help pupils who are dyslexic. We were told a few years ago that we should never say that a child was dyslexic until they'd been referred to the SENCO (Special Needs Co-ordinator) and had tests.


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