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Quick Sea Shanty Questions

Musique174 29 Apr 07 - 02:41 AM
GUEST 29 Apr 07 - 01:17 PM
Musique174 29 Apr 07 - 02:39 PM
GUEST,Psychomorris 29 Apr 07 - 02:57 PM
GUEST,Steve_Cooperator 29 Apr 07 - 04:55 PM
Charley Noble 29 Apr 07 - 05:22 PM
SINSULL 29 Apr 07 - 10:20 PM
Bert 29 Apr 07 - 10:52 PM
GUEST,Nick 29 Apr 07 - 11:02 PM
Jim Lad 30 Apr 07 - 12:04 AM
Gurney 30 Apr 07 - 12:16 AM
Padre 30 Apr 07 - 12:27 AM
Musique174 30 Apr 07 - 01:49 AM
ship*scat 30 Apr 07 - 02:24 AM
Chanteyranger 30 Apr 07 - 03:21 AM
GUEST 30 Apr 07 - 04:19 AM
GUEST,vectis at work 30 Apr 07 - 04:24 AM
GUEST,padgett 30 Apr 07 - 04:34 AM
A Wandering Minstrel 30 Apr 07 - 08:32 AM
The Sandman 30 Apr 07 - 09:27 AM
Barry Finn 30 Apr 07 - 02:27 PM
MMario 30 Apr 07 - 02:43 PM
Marc Bernier 30 Apr 07 - 04:20 PM
Rowan 30 Apr 07 - 06:57 PM
GUEST,Rev 30 Apr 07 - 07:42 PM
GUEST,Rev 30 Apr 07 - 07:45 PM
SINSULL 30 Apr 07 - 08:14 PM
Celtaddict 30 Apr 07 - 10:04 PM
Chanteyranger 01 May 07 - 02:23 AM
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Subject: Quick Sea Shanty Survey
From: Musique174
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 02:41 AM

I am working on an assignment for my music ethnocology class, and I'm focusing on the folk music of the sea. We've been asked to interview someone, and well I've interview 3. But I was surprised by there answers, so I thought I would put the questions here and see what your answers were...

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?
2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?
3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?
4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?
5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?

thanks for your help...


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 01:17 PM

What is "music ethnocology?" Do you mean "ethnomusicology?"


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Musique174
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 02:39 PM

Yes, music-ethnocology, is the same as ethnomusicology, our campus just lists it that way to show its a music degree with a focus on ethnic/world music.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,Psychomorris
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 02:57 PM

Musiquue 174 To answer your questions.
1. Come from a naval port and have heard songs over a number of years sung in local folk clubs. later attendence at Lanchershire Sea Shanty festival and Festivals of the Sea and other festival sing arounds.
2. I learn songs from having heard others sing them. From joining in choruses. From books. from records, tapes. cd's discs. from internet searches. Also have written a couple based upon myself and friends experiences upon the sea. (usually parodies)Usually sing the songs repeatedly (much to the annoyance of my wife family, neighbours and small birds) whilst in the shower. Have been known to practice songs up mountains, Seems to entertain French mountain goats for some reason.
3. No
4. See question two
5. I believe the internet to be most helpful in widening the opportunity to access songs and to claify what I have heard sung.
Hope this helps your assignment. Psychomorris


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,Steve_Cooperator
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 04:55 PM

(1) I got started by going to a shanty-Workshop back in 1980 on Tuesday evenings in London.

(2)I have learned 75%+ of shanties from printed materials, drawing from Hugill, but also from Terry, Doerflinger, Sharp, Whall et. al. On hearing other other performances, recordings, that interest me, i refer back to written sources to check the accuracy and make changes accrdingly.

(3)I like to think that through performance, through workshops, and through recordings I have help provide an educational reference.

(4) See (2)

(5)The internet is useful interms of raising interest in the breadth of maritime music, but references on the internet, unless they are quoting recognised authoritive texts and collections verbatim should not be taken at face value, and should always be referred back to recognised authoritve texts (see question 2 above).


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Charley Noble
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 05:22 PM

1) I first learned sea shanties at song parties with one of our neighbors who was a professional folk singer.

2) I learn the songs generally in my van on the 45-minute drive to practice with my sea music group; I find some songs on recordings, find some in books, some at websites such as Mudcat, others at festivals, others at sea music swaps, and I compose some and adapt others from nautical poems.

3) Others can learn my songs from my CD's, from attending the sea music swaps, or from my website where they can access lyrics and MP3 sound samples.

4) No single source.

5) The internet can be very helpful for finding words, and tracing origins of songs, and for comparing notes; it takes practice to use it well but I don't see any downside.

Cheerily,
Charley Noble


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: SINSULL
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 10:20 PM

1. From Paul Clayton's and Burl Ives' LPs in the 50s. I was a weird little kid.
2. Recordings and shanty sings in Portland, ME and Portsmouth, NH. Mudcat.
3. I used to teach them to children to show them how to work in unison.
4. The Boarding Party CDs and shanty sings. Barry Finn is an amazing source.
5. The internet has made access to the lyrics and recordings so easy. Source material, old recordings, histories of the songs and singers used to be limited to whatever my local library (and in earlier days, Book Bus) had to offer.Of course if someone says that Poor Old Horse is about the disemboweling and pagan sacrifice of a horse at sea to ward off thunderstorms, and enough people read it, it becomes fact for Snopes and soberer minds to sort out.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Bert
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 10:52 PM

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?

At school with songs such as Drunken Sailor, The Mermaid, Plymouth Town etc.. Our music teacher used to get us singing after he'd failed to teach us much about music. Great Guy.

2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?

Singing groups such as The Spinners and The Taverners.

3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?

I try to introduce them at song circles, if you'd call that teaching.

4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?

Probably The Spinners.

5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?

Definately very helpful. Lots of lyrics on Mudcat. Mudcat has also introduced me to other singers such as Barry Flynn who is doing a wonderful job singing shanties. Also introduced me to Bill Sables who taught me that other 'Mermaid' song.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,Nick
Date: 29 Apr 07 - 11:02 PM

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?
2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?
3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?
4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?
5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?

1) I think everyone knows the tune 'What do you do with a drunken sailor" a sea song. now shanties I have come to lean are different. Mostly I got started after hearing Great Big Sea, a band from Newfoundland.
2. Great Big Sea CDs and Stan Hugils book, a record Called "Blow Boys Blow" Also the Digitrad data base.
3. I assault them by playing my pennywhistle on breaks in the parking lot.
4 See above also listening to CJYQ an am radio staion from St. Johns at radionewfoundland.net
5. Helping, otherwise I would never have had a chance to hear or read most of the material

oh did I mention GBS?


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Jim Lad
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 12:04 AM

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?

   At school with songs such as Drunken Sailor, The Mermaid,   
   Plymouth Town etc.. Our music teacher would never tolerate anyone
   singing off key.

2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?

   Singing groups such as The Spinners & Irish Descendants, Jim      
   Payne, Fergus O'Byrne, Buddy MacDonald, Duncan Wells, Tark
   Hamilton and so on..

3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?

    I sings a little.

4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?

   Probably The Spinners & Clancys.

5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional
   sea music? How?

   It gives Great Big Sea fans something to do while the rest of us
   get into folk music.
   Thanks Bert!
   Grin!
   Jim


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Gurney
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 12:16 AM

1/ Drunken sailor in Wolf Cubs (cub scouts) The rest from folk music sources. And Cyril Tawney's club.
2/By ear. Folk sources, and I own ShantiesftSS.
3/ Only by singing them.
4/ Folk clubs.
5/ Neither.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Padre
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 12:27 AM

1. Singing with friends (who later formed the Boarding Party)

2. From other singers, from books such as 'Deep the Water, Shallow the Shore." And in old trunks and on whales' teeth!!

3. Yes - by singing them with other people

4. Jon Eberhart, KC King, Bob Hitchcock, Bob Walser, Eric Ilott, Stan Hugill, and a whole lot more

5. It can be helpful

Padre


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Musique174
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 01:49 AM

You guys are great. Thank you so much. If anyone else wants to pipe up the more the merrier. I love getting to study what I love!
Nathalie


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: ship*scat
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 02:24 AM

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?
The first folk scare in the late '50s (Seegar, to Kingston trio) and precursers (Sam Eskin, Berl Ives, Richard Dyer Bennet) leading to Bert Loydd and Ewan McColl) and finally to the 2nd skipper of "Clear Water" who restored a NY 44 and sang everything on moonlit cruises off City Island in 1970

2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?
Carl Sandburg's collection, records, Singout, leading into the singing of others

3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?
Yes, by going over the chorus. Lately have used printed chorus sheets

4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?
Ditto Padre. Jon Eberhart, Tom McxHenry, Bob Hitchcock, Bob Walser, Eric Ilott, Stan Hugill, Johnny Collins, Jim Megehan and a whole lot more

5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?

The internet is the great communicator. As soon as you figure that written words are just suggestions and not scripture it can be even more helpful.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 03:21 AM

1. I started singing them soon after coming to my first chantey sing at Hyde Street Pier, in November, 1989. I knew of chanteys before, having been inspired by A.L. lloyd and Ewan MacColl's recording, "Whaling Ballads," which i used to check out of the library. I have Celeste Bernardo and mudcatter Rev to thank for encouraging me to start singing at the chantey sings. Rev, who hosted the sings just prior to me, helped put chanteys into context by teaching me how to do actual shipboard jobs to the chanteys. Louis killen was, and is, another major inspration, as ewell as Dick holdstock and Allan Macleod. Everyone mentioned always encouraged me to get out there and sing. My first singing gig was in 1996, with Rev, at the Eugene O'Neill house in Danville, CA.

2. I've learned many from a combination of hearing them at the chantey sings and then looking them up in collections, such as Hugill, Doerflinger, and Colcord. Since I've teamed up with Richard Adrianowicz as a duo, I've taken a keen interest into digging deeper into the trafition, listening to field recordings, recordngs of other current singers, and into other collections. Sea songs appear in many sources other than those desoignated as sea song collections. for example, collections of U.S. slave songs, and international folk song collections contain sea songs, rowing songs and fishing songs. The mystic Seaport Sea Music festival has been another source for learning.

3. Yes, I really enjoy teaching songs and spreading them around. I get a thrill to see the transformation of shy listeners at the chantey sings starting to enjoy singing, and starting to delve into the tradition. I had the honor of joining the camp staff, along with Richard, at the new "Chantey Camp" that started in Fort Flahger, WA earlier this year. I'm planning on giving some free workshops for begining chantey singers later this year.

4. Maybe this was answered in the first question. I can only add that the learning process is for a lifetime.

5. I think the internet is a great source, and has revolutionized the learning process by making lyrics and music available, and by having rare books of songs available literally at your fingertips.

Chanteyranger


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 04:19 AM

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?
When I was young and stupid I thought shanties sounded easy to sing and people joined in so you sounded more competent than you really were. I know better now.
2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?
I find them in books, on line, recordings, ask others for the words, all sorts really.
3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?
I someone wants them I'll give them the words, record them onto their recording device or tell them my source so they can find them for themselves.
4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?
Jim Magean, Brian Ingham and Ken Stevens are inspiring but there are many others that have been sources of material including my Uncle Edward, a fisherman.
5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?
I think it is helping by spreading the knowledge and raising awareness. The music will change and evolve anyway. It is wonderful to hear a shanty or soggy song and be able to find not only the words but sound files and some provenance for them in minutes.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,vectis at work
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 04:24 AM

Oops that was me


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,padgett
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 04:34 AM

Shanty men in UK of note

Hugill and a number of smaller original books published over the years
Johnny Collins, Jim Mageean, Eric Ilott, Roy Harris ~ shanties used by UK trad singers to change the mood and keep audiences singing etc

A number of Shanty crews in UK including Shellback chorus which travels and changes line up depending on the part of Uk in which they are appearing

UK is of course an island and certainly between 70 to 100 miles max to the coast wherever you are in the UK

Ray


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: A Wandering Minstrel
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 08:32 AM

1) started singing along with my late Dad, an ex navy man who taught me Rio Grande and Bowline Haul

2) Years of collecting from other singers and in later years from Stan Hugills Book Shanties from the Seven Seas

3) I sing 'em and others join in. Sometimes I'll post them here if people want the lyrics

4) Dad, Johnny Collins and Jim McGeean, Stan Hugill, Harry Prigg, and a dozen folk clubs down the years, Also Aboard the Winston Churchill and the Barque Endeavour

5) I think it helps to spread lyrics and keep the interest alive, but you can't beat just singing them.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: The Sandman
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 09:27 AM

Jimmageaan,a,lloyd.http://www.dickmiles.com


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Barry Finn
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 02:27 PM

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?

I started working in construction around the age of 18 & always had a love of the water & boats. Having already fallen for folk during the folk scene of the 60's, when I got back into it in the early 70's I naturally drifted towards the songs of labor & the work song genre, espically prison worksongs & shanties. They eventually becaume my favorites to sing.

2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?

At first I learnt off records (LP's), then from taping festivals & concerts. It was slim pickings back then (early 70's) so it was off to the never ending digging through libraries. About that same time I joined the Folk Song Society of Greater Boston which opened more avenues. By the late 70's I had been made the honorary shantyman of a museum ship the brig Carthaginian in Lahinia on Maui where I met George Herbert an old Cape Horner/master mariner/master rigger, singer, musician (anglo concerina, tenor uke & harmonica) & collector as well as a source. We became friends until he died, from him I collected maybe better than 1/2 dozen songs that I have't heard elsewhere. The Mystic Sea Music festivals started up shorty after that when I returned to Boston, so now there was a place for shanties & shantey lovers to get together & network. Talking shop with others was also a great source of shanties.

3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?

No, I never taught, though I have done workshops. I sing them freely & welcome anyone to them. When asked I've always been happy for others to sing them. If they'er decent enough that others ask for them or about them I think of it as gardening from seed. Spread them & they'll grow on their own & in their own way. I feel as if I've done a good job (& I feel it is my job & as well a labor of love if they're passed on) when I hear that others are singing songs that they've had from me, espically if they've recorded some of them. Shortly I'll put some out on my 1st ever recording.

4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?

Mostly from other singers of shanties and sailors. Most blue water or deep water sailors (espically tall ship sailors) have a couple that they love & can relate to in their back pouch somewhere, and other shantey singers, if they love them, they are always on the hunt for new good material to sing & bring forth.

5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?

I agree with the above others that the internet has been a wonderful place for all music types. Through the olnline forums, availability of lyrics & music, the face to face meetings arranged though the internet, the group meetings, festivals, singing clubs all benifit & inhance the spreading of musical infomation, pleasure, history, knowledge & the sharing of shanties & other musical forms. It's a great place for digging, mining & exploring espically for those songs within the traditional genres.

Barry


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: MMario
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 02:43 PM

Barry, Barry, Barry! How can you say you've never taught ? ! ?

By example, with enthusiasm, with your *incredible* repetoire.

You don't give yourself enough credi.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Marc Bernier
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 04:20 PM

1. Hanging out at the Gris. I grew up in coastal Connecticut. Cliff Haslam has been performing on Monday evenings at the Griswald Inn in Essex, Ct., pretty regularly for over 30 years now. I spent several years as a young man leaning against that bar every Monday night doing field research.

2. I believe I've collected the majority of my repertoire, listening to and singing with other people. Of course once I started getting paid to do this music, I'v relied extensively on collections and oral history to document or legitimize my material. Today I collect music from almost anywhere although I would venture to say that I rarely learn songs from recordings.

3. I hope so, and yes you do Barry, although I can't think of any versions of chanteys being sung out there in which I can recognize myself as the source. There are folks out there singing this music that have been listening to me for a long time now. I will do school groups and workshops from time to time as the work is available.

4. Isn't this the same as question #2

5. I don't think the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music. I don't believe there is anything available on the net that is not in the collections we've been using for the last 1/2 century. I don't like to use the net as a research tool, I feel it deprives one of a tremendous amount of peripheral information that was taken in through traditional forms of research, Books, card catalogues, singing with old men... Don't get me wrong, if I want to sing a specific song at a specific gig tomorrow night, I'm quite likely to come to mud-cat and get the lyrics. The internet is alot quicker than looking for it the old fashion way. But I can't say that I use it for actual building of repertoire or research. There is no substitute for singing with old men


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Rowan
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 06:57 PM

"music-ethnocology, is the same as ethnomusicology, our campus just lists it that way to show its a music degree with a focus on ethnic/world music"

The emphasis on music is great, but it sounds like the campus is confusing ecology with ethnography. But that aside;

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?
"Boney was a warrior", "Drunken Sailor", "South Australia" and "Little Fishy" were songs I learned at primary school (I think they're called Grade School in the US)) in the 40s.

2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?
"Mostly by singing with others" would answer both questions about most of my songs, including the maritime ones. When a uni student, most parties would repair to the kitchen after about 10pm (when most of the records had been played and danced to) and the singing would take over until the small hours. Most of the songs would have been chorus or participatory (rounds and catches, antiphon-response etc) so everyone would get a guernsey. I was lucky enough to have a fair memory for words and tunes, which helped. More specifically (as far as voice development was concerned) I had only a certain amount of tolerance for guitarists who'd just noodle away at non sequitur sounds at gatherings when people wanted to sing. I had a voice that carried over the sounds of furniture vans and guitars on mountaineering club trips; great for improving the sort of projection required for shanties in a live (working) situation..

3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?
When asked. By getting them to join in and/or writing the words for them.

4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?
Others, mostly in live (singing) sessions.

5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?
Like other resources it can be great but you need to be careful how you weigh the material proferred as "authentic" evidence.

Cheers, Rowan


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,Rev
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 07:42 PM

Yes, Rowan, I'm about 99.9% sure that "ethnocology" is not a real word. Let's hope that the school means "music ethnology" or "ethnography." As an ethnomusicologist myself, it's a bit mystifying to me that her school doesn't use the common designation for the field. Nevertheless, Musique's interest and enthusiasm seem sincere, and I heartily encourage anyone who's interested in sea music. Here are my answers.

1. How did you get started singing Sea Shanties and Sea Songs?

I grew up in Stonington, CT., and in the summers starting when I was 13, I volunteered at Mystic Seaport. I learned chanteys like "Hanging Johnny" and "John Kanaka" from the chantey singers who were working there in the early 80's, like Bob Walser and Dan Lanier. When I got older I joined the Seaport's Marine Outdoor Demonstration Squad, where I learned from Geoff Kaufmann, Craig Edwards, and Rick Spencer, and from all the great people who attended the Sea Music festival back then: Stan Hugill, Holdstock and McLeod, Goux and Soulanowski, Stuart Frank and Mary Malloy, Cindy Kallet, etc...


2. How do you learn your songs? Where do you find them?

Most I have learned over time, from repeated listening to other singers, both live and on recordings. I do go to the main books to double check lyrics and tunes, etc... but I prefer the oral transmission to the printed page. Since being in grad school I have also done a lot of taping of live performances, and I can get songs from those recordings, and have done a lot of research with sailors journals and copybooks, which contain lots of great songs. Finding the tunes in those cases is sometimes hard, but not too bad if you know where to look.

3. Do you teach others your songs? If so in what way?

I have a band and I teach the other players sea music by ear. I have performed sea music at schools, fairs, festivals, and museums for many years, and I think everyone who plays this music is teaching the songs to some degree.

4. Who or where have you learned most of your sea music from?

See question 1, and add that I have continued to collect songs everywhere I go, from every singer I meet. I was lucky enough to work in San Francisco with Celeste Bernardo, Louis Killen, and (mudcatter) Chanteyranger, as well as a bunch of great volunteer singers like radriano (and a few who weren't so great), so I learned a lot while I was working there.

5. Would you say the internet is helping or harming the traditional sea music? How?
I think the internet has been great in helping chantey singers connect from all over the world. For example, before the internet, many of us wouldn't have known about the running shanty controversy in Liverpool, but now we can all kvetch about it in real time! But seriously, Mudcat is a great example of the benefits of the internet for the sea music scene.

Good luck with your project.
Rev


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: GUEST,Rev
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 07:45 PM

Oh, and if you're interested in checking out my band we have a myspace page:


The Scrimshaw Crimps

Rev


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: SINSULL
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 08:14 PM

Barry has never taught???? What about the Bench Moving Shanty? Doesn't that count?


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Celtaddict
Date: 30 Apr 07 - 10:04 PM

1. I learned a few as a kid as everyone I know did, Blow the Man Down and Drunken Sailor and a handful of others. I enjoyed and learned a wide variety of traditional music through the 60s & 70s. But I was lucky enough to move to Connecticut shortly after the Sea Music Festival was started, and to be there and hear, and that is really where I became hooked on shanties specifically, singing along there.

2. Most of them, from hearing them at SMF and related events, then pestering the singers for words, buying their recordings, taping, or looking them up. But the actual learning of the songs was from joining in. I have accumulated a decent library of the books as well as LPs/tapes/CDs. I am also quite shameless about begging folks for their versions, and am quick at shorthand and transcription.

3. I pass the words along to folks a lot because I am lucky enough to retain them easily. My voice is not strong enough to sing for a big crowd. But I have taught a number of them to groups of kids, Boy and Girl Scouts particularly. If you listen ahead mentally so you don't sing yourself into a corner, a number of them are good from preschool on. We sang a lot in the car, with my kids, and also skiing, of all things, when a regular rhythm is both helpful and fun; my daughter for example belted out 'Windy Old Weather' as she swooped down Vermont mountains.

4. By far the most from listening in person, both to folks on stage or in coffee house or pub, and to folks around me after hours. Recordings in the car are second. When I find them in books, even with the music there (and sightreading is no problem), I still have a hard time considering myself to 'know' a song if I have not heard someone sing it.

5. I agree with Marc that the old people are best, old books second best, old recordings third, for learning, formally or informally, and I adore the backroad information one inevitably stumbles across. But the Net can be a huge help for those things for which I may search for years before I find the book, or may not have access to because it is in the Seaport archives. (And of course the Net has plenty of back roads too.) The potential harm is that, as in every area of knowledge, misinformation can be spread astoundingly far and fast so anyone who does not evaluate what one reads may be misled. But even the great advantage of being able to find something obscure is eclipsed by the advantage of being able to run across someone interested in the same thing, though they might be in Australia or Scotland and I would be unlikely to meet them otherwise, or they may be ten miles away but I would not know we shared the interest.


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Subject: RE: Quick Sea Shanty Questions
From: Chanteyranger
Date: 01 May 07 - 02:23 AM

"London Julie," and "Hard Times In Old Virginia" are being sung by chantey enthusiasts on both coasts because many of us first heard them sung by Barry Finn. As others have said, you ARE a teacher, Barry.

Chanteyranger


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Mudcat time: 22 September 8:20 PM EDT

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