Mudcat Café message #768780 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #50640   Message #768780
Posted By: MMario
20-Aug-02 - 06:37 PM
Thread Name: Wild Boar: History, Lyrics & Discussion-Child #18
Subject: Lyr/Tune Add: ISAAC-A-BELL AND HUGH THE GRAEME etc
X:1
T:ISAAC-A-BELL and HUGH THE GRAEME
N:Child 18B
N:Bronson 18.1
N:Christie 1876
N:Sung by an old woman in Buckie 1850
I:abc2nwc
M:2/4
L:1/16
K:Bb
z6C2|D2 G2 G2 (A B)|A2 (A G) F4"^|"
|G4(A3 G)|A2 d2 z2"^|"
c2|d2 d2 c2 (B A)|G2 (A B) D2 "^|"
F3/2 E/2|D3 C B,3 C|D2 G2 z2z2
w:A KNIGHT had two sons_ o sma_ fame,
[Hey nien_ nan-ny]
I-saac-a-Bell and_ Hugh the_ Graeme.
[And the nor-lan flowers spring bon-ny]


ISAAC-A-BELL and HUGH THE GRAEME

A KNIGHT had two sons o sma fame,
[Hey nien nanny]
Isaac-a-Bell and Hugh the Graeme.
[And the norlan flowers spring bonny]

And to the youngest he did say,
What occupation will you hae?
[When the, etc.]

Will you gae fee to pick a mill?
Or will you keep hogs on yon hill?
[While the, etc.]

I winna fee to pick a mill,
Nor will I keep hogs on yon hill.

But it is said, as I do hear,
That war will last for seven year,
[And the, etc.]

With a giant and a boar
That range into the wood o Tore.

Youll horse and armour to me provide,
That through Tore wood I may safely ride.
[When the, etc.]

The knicht did horse and armour provide,
That through Tore wood Graeme micht safely ride.

Then he rode through the wood o Tore,
And up it started the grisly boar.

The firsten bout that he did ride,
The boar he wounded in the left side.

The nexten bout at the boar he gaed,
He from the boar took aff his head.
[And the, etc.]

As he rode back through the wood o Tore,
Up started the giant him before.

O cam you through the wood o Tore,
Or did you see my good wild boar?

I cam now through the wood o Tore,
But woe be to your grisly boar.

The firsten bout that I did ride,
I wounded your wild boar in the side.

The nexten bout at him I gaed,
From your wild boar I took aff his head.

Gin you have cut aff the head o my boar,
Its your head shall be taen therfore.

Ill gie you thirty days and three,
To heal your wounds, then come to me.
[While the, etc.]

Its after thirty days and three,
When my wounds heal, Ill come to thee.
[When the, etc.]

So Graeme is back to the wood o Tore,
And hes killd the giant, as he killd the boar.
[And the, etc.]



X:2
T:OLD BANG 'EM
N:Davis
N:Sung by Evelyn Purcell - 1913
N:Handed down from her great-grandfather c 1760
I:abc2nwc
M:2/4
L:1/16
K:G
z6zD|D2 G2 G2 E2|F2 G2 A4"^|"
|G G3 A4|F D3 z3"^|"
D|D2 G2 G2 E2|F2 G2 A4"^|"
|G G3 A4-|A4"^|"
A4|A2 d2 d2 B2|c2 B2 A4"^|"
|c2 B2 A2 G2|A2 F2 D4"^|"
|D D3 B4-|B3 A G3 A "^|"
|D D3 F4|F7z
w:Old Ban-g'em would a-hunt-ing ride,
[Dil-lem, down, dil-lem]
Old Bang-'em would a-hun-ting ride
[Dil-lem down]_
Old Bang-'em would a-hunt-ing ride,
Sword and pis-tol by his side
[Cub-by, ki,_ cud-dle down
Kil-li, Quo, Quam]

OLD BANG 'EM


Old Bang'em would a-hunting ride,
[Dillem, down, dillem]
Old Bang'em would a-hunting ride
[Dillem down]
Old Bang'em would a-hunting ride,
Sword and pistol by his side
[Cubby, ki, cuddle down
Killi, Quo, Quam]

There is a wild boar in this wood
Will eat your meat and suck your blood

Oh how shall I this wild boar see?
Blow a blast and he'll come to thee

Old Bang'em blew both load and shrill
The wild boar heard on Temple Hill

The wild boar came with such a rush
He tore down hickory, oak and ash

Old Bang'em drew his wooden knife
And swore that he would take his life

Old Bang'em did you win or lose
He swore that he had won the shoes





X:3
T:WILD BOAR
N:Bronson 18.2
N:Halpert
N:Sung by Samuel Harmon 1939
N:Learned from his father
I:abc2nwc
M:3/2
L:1/8
K:C
z6D2G2G2|B2B2 (3(G2A2)B2E4"^|"
G6B2A4|c c4"^|"
(B d) e2d2|c2c2 (3(A2B2)c2 (3E2"^|"
D2E2|G2B6A2G2|E G- G4
w:Ab-ram_ Bai-ley he'd_ three sons
[Blow your horn cen-ter]
And_ he is through the wild_-wood gone
Just like a jo-vi-al hun-ter_


WILD BOAR

Abram Bailey he'd three sons
[Blow your horn center]
And he is through the wildwood gone
Just like a jovial hunter

As he marched down the greenwood side
A pretty girl o there he spied
[As he was a jovial hunter]

There is a wild boar all in this wood
He slew the lord and his forty men

How can I this wild boar see?
Wind up your horn and he'lll come to you
[As you are etc]

He wound his horn unto his mouth
He blew East, North West and South
[As he was etc]

The wild boar heard him unto his den
He made the oak and ash then far to bend

The fit three hours by the day
And at length he this wild boar slay

He meets the old witch wife on the bridge
Begone you rogue, you've killed my pig
[as you are etc]

There is three things I crave of thee
Your hawk, your hound, your gay lady

These three things you'll not have of me
Neither hawk nor hound nor gay lady

He split the old witch wife to the chin
And on his way he went ag'in
Julst like a jovial hunter.



X:4
T:SIR EGLAMORE
N:D'Urfey 1719
I:abc2nwc
M:6/4
L:1/8
K:G
z6z4G2|G4G2(E2F2)G2|A4F2D6"^|"
|B6c6|d3d B2G2G2"^|"
G2|G2G2G2E2F2G2|A4F2D6"^|"
|B6c6|d3d B2G2G2"^|"
G2|B4c2d4B2|e4d2c4"^|"
B2|A4G2F4E2|A4G2F4"^|"
E2|D6G6|F6E3D E2|D6"^|"
G3A F2|G2G4-G4z2
w:Sir Eg-la-more,_ that va-liant Knight,
[Fa la, lan-ky down dil-ly]
He took up his sword and he went to fight
[Fa la, lan-ky down dil-ly;]
And as he rode o'er Hill and Dale,
All arm-ed with a coat of male,
[fa la la la la la la lalan-ky down dil-ly]_

SIR EGLAMORE


Sir Eglamore, that valiant Knight,
[Fa la, lanky down dilly]
He took up his sword and he went to fight
[Fa la, lanky down dilly;]
And as he rode o'er Hill and Dale,
All armed with a coat of male,
[fa la la la la la lanky down dilly]

There leap'd a Dragon out of her Den
That had slain god knows how many Men;
But when she saw Sir Eglamore,
Oh that you had but heard her roar!

Then the Trees began to shake,
Horse did tremble, Man did quake
The birds betook them all to peeping
Ah! 'twould have made one fall a weeping

But all in vain it was to fear,
For now they fall to't, fight Dog, fight bear,
And to't they go, and soundly fight,
A live-long day, from Morn till night.

This Dragon had on a plaguy Hide,
That could the sharpest steel abide,
No Sword could enter her with cuts,
Which vex'd the Knight unto the Guts.

But as in Choler he did burn,
He watch'd the Dragon a great good turn
For as a Yawning she did fall
He thrust his Sword up hilt and all.

Then Like a coward she did fly,
Unto her den, which was hard by;
And there she lay all Night and roar'd
The Knight was sorry for his Word
But riding away, he cries, I forsake it!
He that will fetch it, let him take it!




X:5
T:SIR LIONEL
N:Kidson - from an unknown source
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
z6D2|D2G2F2G2|A2B2G4"^|"
|G G z2A2z2|B G z2z2"^|"
D2|D2G2F2G2|A2B2G4"^|"
|d d z2^c2z2|d4z2"^|"
B2|g2f2e2d2|e2d2c2"^|"
B2|c2B2A2G2|A2G2E4"^|"
| (3E2F2G2D4|E G3D4"^|"
E E z2F2z2|G4z2z2
w:(As) Tom and Har-ry went to plough,
[dil-lom down dil-lom]
As Tom and Har-ry went to plough
[Quid-ly Qou Quam]
As Tom and Har-ry went to plough
They saw a fair maid on a bough
[Kam-ber-ry Quo, Quod-dle dam,
Quid-ly Qou Quam]

SIR LIONEL

(As)Tom and Harry went to plough,
[dillom down dillom]
As Tom and Harry went to plough
[Quidly Qou Quam]
As Tom and Harry went to plough
They saw a fair maid on a bough
[Kamberry Quo, Quoddle dam, Quidly Qou Quam]

Why do ye, fair maid, sit so high
That no young man can you come nigh?

The fair maid unto them did say
If you can fetch me down you may

There is a wild boar in the wood
If he comes out he'll suck your blood

The wild boar came with such a sound
That rocks and hills and trees fell down.




X:6
T:BRANGYWELL
N:Leather - 1912
N:Sung by Mrs. Mellor
N:Noted by R. Hughes Rowlands
I:abc2nwc
M:4/4
L:1/8
K:G
z6zD|G3/2 A/2 B3A B3/2 c/2|B4z4|E/2 E/2 zA2F/2 D/2 zz"^|"
D|G3/2 A/2 B3A B3/2 c/2|B4z4|E/2 E/2 z(F G) A2"^|"
B|c3/2 d/2 e3d c3/2 B/2|A4z3"^|"
B|c3B A3G|F2E2D2z"^|"
G/2 G/2|E2zA/2 A/2 D2z"^|"
E/2 E/2|F2G2z4
w:As Bran-gy-well went forth to plough
[dil-lum, down dil-lum]
As Bran-gy-well went forth to plough,
[Kil ly co_ quam]
As Bran-gy-well went forth to plough
He spied a la-dy on a bough
[Kil ly do cud-dle dame
Kil ly co quam]

BRANGYWELL

As Brangywell went forth to plough
[dillum, down dillum]
As Brangywell went forth to plough,
[Kil ly co quam]
As Brangywell went forth to plough
He spied a lady on a bough
[Kil ly do cuddle dame
Kil ly co quam]

What makes thee sit so high, lady
That no one can come night to thee

There is a wild boar in the wood
If I come down he'll suck my blood

If I should kill the boar, said he
Wilt though come down and marry me?

If thou should'st kill the boar, said she
I will come down and marry thee

Then Brangywell pull out his dart
And shot the wild boar through the heart

The wild boar fetched out such a sound
That all the oaks and ash fell down

Then hand in hand they went to the den
And found the bones of twenty men.