Mudcat Café message #3616836 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #153915   Message #3616836
Posted By: Richie
08-Apr-14 - 10:00 PM
Thread Name: Origins: Child Ballads: US Versions Part 7
Subject: RE: Origins: Child Ballads: US Versions Part 7
Hi,

Randolph in his Ozark Kolksongs lumps "Valiant Soldier" with "New River Shore" versions. His C and D versions are White River Shore and Red versions.

I've followed Randolph realizing the association is tenuous at best. Here is the first extant version from 1864. I've taken the liberty to translate since it was "writ" by a rebel in the Civil War- haha:

"New River Shoor [sic]"

1. at the foot of yon Montain wher fountain do flow,
there is music to entertain me whar Plesent wind blow;
thare I spide a fair Damsel, a girl I adoar,
as she was a Walking on the new river Shoar.

2. I ask her rite kinley could She fancy Me,
all tho my fourtun is not grat that's noth She She,
your Beuty is a nonf (enough) and it is you I a doar,
an it is you I will Mary on the new river Shoar.

3. as soon as her old father, this same come too her,
he swear he Wood de Prive mee of my Deares Dear.
he Sent me a way Wher loud canon do roar,
an left my Dear trulove on the new river shoar.

4. She rote Me a letter an in this letter these lines,
and in this letter these Words you May find:
Come Back My dear dewell for it you I a doar,
an it is you I Will Mary on the new river Shoar.

5. I Prused this letter I Prused it monst Sad,
thare was non in that company culd Make My hart glad,
I drew out My Brawd Soard an onward did go,
to meet My dear tru love on the new river shoar.

6. as Son as her old father, tis same came to hear,
he Swar he wood de Prive Me of my derest der.
he rased him a army fooul twenty or Moar,
to fite a yong Soalger on the new river Shoar.

7. I Drew out My Brawd Soard an Waverd it round,
there is no yous, My little army, that you all kno,
to fight a yong Soalg on the new river Shoar.

8. So hard is the Coquest of all women kind,
they all Ways hav ruld, they all Ways confined;
they hav children to Squall an husban to scold,
Makes Many yong lases look Wethered and old.

-----------------

"New River Shore"- Landreth c. 1864 [transcribed Matteson]

1. At the foot of yon mountain where fountains do flow,
There is music to entertain me where pleasant winds blow;
There I spied a fair damsel, a girl I adore,
As she was a walking on the New River Shore.

2. I asked her right kindly could she fancy me,
Although my fortune is not great. "That's nothing," said she,[1]
"Your beauty is enough and it is you I adore,
And it is you I will marry on the New River Shore."

3. As soon as her old father, this same come to hear,
He swore he would deprive me of my dearest dear.
He sent me a way where loud cannons do roar,
And left my dear truelove on the New River Shore.

4. She wrote me a letter and in this letter these lines,
And in this letter these words you may find:
Come back my dear jewel for it you I adore,
And it is you I will marry on the New river Shore.

5. I pressed[2] this letter, I pressed it most sad,
There was none in that company could make my heart glad,
I drew out my broad sword an onward did go,
To meet my dear true love on the New River Shore.

6. As soon as her old father, this same came to hear,
He swore he wood deprive me of my dearest dear.
He raised him an army full twenty or more,
To fight a young soldier on the New River Shore.

7. I drew out my broad sword and wavered it round,
[Till twenty or more lay dead on the ground.] [3]
"There is no use, my little army, that you all know,
To fight a young soldier on the New River Shore."

8. So hard is the conquest of all women kind,
They've always been ruled, they're always confined;
They have children to school and a husband to scold,
Makes many young lasses look withered and old.

1. Should end with "she," the best solution: "That's nothing" said she.
2. pressed could mean "sealed" here.
3. The second line is missing here, so I filled it in using a modified traditional line (See: Brown Collection).

This version, titled "New River Shore" is taken from Frank Moore's Anecdotes, Poetry and Incidents of the War: North and South: 1860-1865. In William Forse Scott's ‎1893 book, "The Story of a Cavalry Regiment," we find that Landreth, a rebel, fought in the Civil War for Shelby in Price's army: "It was found among papers lost by William H. Landreth, who was with Shelby in Price's army, in Missouri, in 1864."

Moore provided some details: "After the retreat of Shelby's force from Boonville, Mo. a small bundle of papers was picked up on the street, left there by some systematic and sentimental Confederate in his hasty flight First among this bundle was the log-book, containing a succinct diary of events, belonging to a rebel soldier. The leaves of the diary were composed of heavily ruled, coarse blue foolscap, and the cover made of wall-paper."