Mudcat Café message #3318174 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #143708   Message #3318174
Posted By: Mick Pearce (MCP)
06-Mar-12 - 09:48 AM
Thread Name: Origins: Child Ballads: US Versions Part 2
Subject: RE: Origins: Child Ballads: US Versions Part 2
Richie here's Lazarus from EFSSA. Note that Sharp doesn't include this in the Ballad section but in the Songs. He does however, in his notes, refer to Child 56:

Texts with tunes:- Davis's Traditional Ballads of Virginia, pp175 and 566. Compare Child's English and Scottish Popular Ballads, No.56. Journal of the Folk Song Society, ii. 125; viii. 19

This is from my hard copy, but you can find EFSSA at archive.org too: EFSSA - 1917 edition

Let me know if you want the tune posted too.


Mick




Lazarus

There was a man in ancient times,
The Scriptures doth inform us,
Whose pomp and grandeur and whose crimes
Was great and very num'rous.
This rich man fared sumptuously each day
And was dressed in purple fine linen
He eat and drink, but scorned to pray,
And spent his day in sinning.

This poor man lay at the rich man's gate,
To help himself unable,
And there he lay to humbly wait
For the crumbs from his rich table.
But not one crumb would this happy cure (epicure)
Ever aye protend to send him.
The dogs took pity and licked his sores,
More ready to befriend him.

This poor man died at the rich man's gate,
Where angel bands attended;
Straightway to Abraham's bosom flown,
Where all his sorrows ended.
This rich man died and was buried too,
But O, his dreadful station;
With Abraham and Lazarus both in view
He landed in damnation.

He cried: O father Abraham,
Send Lazarus with cold water,
For I'm tormented in these flames
With these tormenting tortures.
Says Abraham: Son, remember well,
You once did God inherit,
But now at last your doom's in hell
Because you would not cherish.
Go where you cannot now enjoy,
Which augments your damnation;
Besides there is a gulf between
Prevents communication.

Source: Sharp English Folk Songs from the Southern Appalachians, sung by Mr & Mrs Gabriel Coates at Flag Pond, Tenn., Sept. 1, 1916