Mudcat Café message #2147961 The Mudcat Café TM
Thread #6329   Message #2147961
Posted By: Jim Dixon
13-Sep-07 - 12:01 AM
Thread Name: Lyr/Tune Add: Over the Mountain (Boys of the Lough
Subject: Lyr Add: THE TRUE-LOVER'S TRIP O'ER THE MOUNTAIN
Here's one of the versions from the Bodleian Library. (Thanks to Malcolm Douglas for the link.) Note it's got one more verse than the version posted by John W above.

By the way: I added punctuation, as I usually do, but this time I had a bit of trouble figuring out where to put the quotation marks. I'm not certain I got it right.

THE TRUE-LOVER'S TRIP O'ER THE MOUNTAIN

One night as the moon illumined the sky,
When I first took a notion to marry,
I put on my hat and away I did hie.
You might think I had been in a hurry!
When I reached the dwelling where oft I had been,
My heart gave a leap when my charmer I'd seen.
I raised up the latch and I bid her good e'en,
And I said, "Will you come o'er the mountain?"

"What notion is that you have got in your head?
I'm glad for to meet you so merry.
It's past twelve o'clock when I should be in bed.
Speak low or my mother will hear you."
"If I be jesting, my jesting is true.
I courted a year and I think it should do.
Before that I sleep, I'll get married to you,
If you'll venture with me o'er the mountain."

"If I was to make an elopement with you,
It might be attended with danger.
The country would tattle and censure us, too,
And my friends they would frown, and no wonder."
"We'll just let them tattle and censure away,
Consult with yourself for it's very nigh day.
I don't care a fig what any of them say,
If I once had you over the mountain."

"Oh, then you're in earnest," she said with a smile.
"Kind providence be my director."
I have love in my bosom I ne'er will deny,
Though the sentence it seemed to affect her.
"I'm using no magic, no art, nor no spell.
I've a true honest heart, and I love you right well;
And if you refuse me, sweet girl, farewell.
My steps I'll retrace o'er the mountain.

"So now I'm resolved at home for to stay.
I think it far safer and better.
So fare thee well, girl, as I must away;
So that puts an end to the matter."
"Oh! stop for a moment till I get on my shoes."
My heart gave a leap when I heard the glad news.
She flew to the door saying, "I hope you'll excuse
My simplicity over the mountain."

By this time the moon had sunk in the west,
And the morning star brightly was shining;
And thus we pursued our journey in haste,
And joined at the altar of Hymen.
So now in contentment we spent the long day.
Though the anger of marriage was soon blown away,
We oftentimes chat when we've little to say,
On the trip we took over the mountain.