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Goose Gander Three Butchers: WHY the naked woman? (82* d) RE: Three Butchers: WHY the naked woman? 08 Apr 10


Here's another American version without specific mention of the woman's nakedness . . .

THREE BUTCHERS

It was on a Sunday morn
When three bloody butcher boys
Set out to seek their fortune
Ten thousand miles away

They had not rode so very far
Upon a mountain high
When Johnson said, "Listen, listen, boys
I hear a woman's cry"

"Oh, pretty, pretty woman
What are you doing here?"
"Seven bold robbers chained me
An left me here to die"

Now Johnson being kind
Threw his cloak about her
He mounted on his horses back
And put her up behind

They rode for five miles
On the mountainside
When out stepped the bold robbers
With weapons in their hands

They fought from ten o'clock
Until three in the afternoon
They killed the seven bold robbers
And laid them in the sun

Now Johnson being tired
Sat down for to rest
Up stepped this wicked woman
And stabbed him in the breast

"Oh, wicked, wicked woman
What have you done to me?
You have killed the bravest butcher boy
In North Amerikee'

"(S)ung by Sam Ansel of Stroud and contributed by Carl M. Perry of Tulsa. The singer was born in Arkansas and lived in Texas and Oklahoma until his death in 1930. His parents came from Tennessee and Kentucky."

Ethel and Chauncey Moore, Ballads and Folk Songs of the Southwest (Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1964), p.156-157.


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